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Äquatorialguinea

  • Präsident:Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo
  • Premierminister:Francisco Pascual Eyegue Obama Asue
  • Hauptstadt:Malabo
  • Sprachen:Spanish (official) 67.6%, other (includes French (official), Fang, Bubi) 32.4% (1994 census)
  • Regierung
  • Nationales Amt für Statistik
  • Bevölkerung, Personen:1.267.689 (2017)
  • Fläche, km2:28.050 (2017)
  • BIP pro Kopf, US$:9.850 (2017)
  • BIP, Milliarden aktuelle US $:12,5 (2017)
  • Gini-Koeffizient:No data
  • Ease-of-Doing-Business-Rang:173 (2017)
Alle Datensätze:  A E F I M N S T U W
  • A
    • März 2019
      Quelle: World Bank
      Hochgeladen von: Knoema
      Zugriff am: 20 März, 2019
      Datensatz auswählen
      Data cited at: The World Bank https://datacatalog.worldbank.org/ Topic: Africa Development Indicators Publication: https://datacatalog.worldbank.org/dataset/africa-development-indicators License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/   Africa Development Indicators (ADI) provides the most detailed collection of development data on Africa, compiled from officially-recognized international sources. It presents the most current and accurate global development data available, and includes national, regional and global estimates.
    • August 2018
      Quelle: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Hochgeladen von: Knoema
      Zugriff am: 19 November, 2018
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      AQUASTAT is FAO's global information system on water and agriculture, developed by the Land and Water Division. The main mandate of the program is to collect, analyze and disseminate information on water resources, water uses, and agricultural water management with an emphasis on countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean. This allows interested users to find comprehensive and regularly updated information at global, regional, and national levels.
    • Januar 2014
      Quelle: World Resources Institute
      Hochgeladen von: Knoema
      Zugriff am: 07 Dezember, 2015
      Datensatz auswählen
      This dataset shows countries and river basins' average exposure to five of Aqueduct's water risk indicators: baseline water stress, interannual variability, seasonal variability, flood occurrence, and drought severity. Risk exposure scores are available for every country (except Greenland and Antarctica), the 100 most populous river basins, and the 100 largest river basins by area. Scores are also available for all industrial, agricultural, and domestic users' average exposure to each indicator in each country and river basin. Citation: Gassert, F., P. Reig, T. Luo, and A. Maddocks. 2013. “Aqueduct country and river basin rankings: a weighted aggregation of spatially distinct hydrological indicators.” Working paper. Washington, DC: World Resources Institute, November 2013. Available online at http://wri.org/publication/aqueduct-country-river-basin-rankings.
    • August 2015
      Quelle: World Resources Institute
      Hochgeladen von: Knoema
      Zugriff am: 25 März, 2019
      Datensatz auswählen
      Suggested citation: Luo, T., R. Young, and P. Reig. 2015. "Aqueduct projected water stress rankings." Technical note. Washington, DC: World Resources Institute, August 215. Available online at http://www.wri.org/publication/aqueduct-projected-water-stress-country-rankings.    Supplemental Materials: Country Scores                         WRI projected future country-level water stress for 2020, 2030, and 2040 under business-as-usual (BAU), optimistic, and pessimistic scenarios. Each tab lists country projected water stress scores for each scenario and year, weighted by overall water withdrawals. Scores weighted by individual sectors (agricultural, domestic, and industrial) are provided as well.   These global projections are best suited to making comparisons among countries for the same year and among scenarios and decades for the same region. More detailed and localized data or scenarios can better estimate potential outcomes for specific regions and expose large sub-national variations that are subsumed under countrywide water-stress values. The country indicators face persistent limitations in attempting to simplify complex information, such as spatial and temporal variations, into a single number. They also do not account for the governance and investment structure of the water sector in different countries.    It is important to note the inherent uncertainty in estimating any future conditions, particularly those associated with climate change, future population and economic trends, and water demand. Additionally, care should be taken when examining the change rates of a country’s projected stress levels between one year and another, because the risk-score thresholds are not linear. For more information on these limitations, see the technical note.   Projections are described in further detail in: Luck, M., M. Landis, and F. Gassert, “Aqueduct Water Stress Projections: Decadal Projections of Water Supply and Demand Using CMIP5 GCMs,” Technical note (Washington, DC: World Resources Institute, April 2015), http://www.wri.org/publication/aqueduct-water-stress-projections.   Water Stress withdrawals / available flow Water stress measures total annual water withdrawals (municipal, industrial, and agricultural) expressed as a percentage of the total annual available blue water. Higher values indicate more competition among users. Score Value [0-1) Low (<10%) [1-2) Low to medium (10-20%) [2-3) Medium to high (20-40%) [3-4) High (40-80%) [4-5] Extremely high (>80%)    
  • E
    • Mai 2019
      Quelle: International Labour Organization
      Hochgeladen von: Knoema
      Zugriff am: 21 Mai, 2019
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      The employed comprise all persons of working age who, during a specified brief period, were in the following categories: a) paid employment (whether at work or with a job but not at work); or b) self-employment (whether at work or with an enterprise but not at work). Data are disaggregated by economic activity according to the latest version of the International Standard Industrial Classification of All Economic Activities (ISIC) available for that year. Economic activity refers to the main activity of the establishment in which a person worked during the reference period and does not depend on the specific duties or functions of the person's job, but on the characteristics of the economic unit in which this person works.
  • F
    • Juli 2015
      Quelle: African Development Bank Group
      Hochgeladen von: Knoema
      Zugriff am: 06 August, 2015
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      The AfDB Statistics Department and the Fragile States Unit have compiled this data set from various sources (the World Bank, WHO, IMF, and many others)
  • I
    • Oktober 2015
      Quelle: Water FootPrint Network
      Hochgeladen von: Knoema
      Zugriff am: 27 Oktober, 2015
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      Data cited at: The Water Footprint Network https://waterfootprint.org/en/ Topic: International virtual water flow statistics  Publication: https://waterfootprint.org/en/resources/waterstat/international-virtual-water-flow-statistics/ Reference: Hoekstra, A.Y. & Mekonnen, M.M. (2012) The water footprint of humanity, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 109(9): 3232–3237 License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
  • M
    • März 2019
      Quelle: World Bank
      Hochgeladen von: Knoema
      Zugriff am: 20 März, 2019
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      Data cited at: The World Bank https://datacatalog.worldbank.org/ Topic: Millennium Development Goals Publication: https://datacatalog.worldbank.org/dataset/millennium-development-goals License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/   Relevant indicators drawn from the World Development Indicators, reorganized according to the goals and targets of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The MDGs focus the efforts of the world community on achieving significant, measurable improvements in people's lives by the year 2015: they establish targets and yardsticks for measuring development results. Gender Parity Index (GPI)= Value of indicator for Girls/ Value of indicator for Boys. For e.g GPI=School enrolment for Girls/School enrolment for Boys. A value of less than one indicates differences in favor of boys, whereas a value near one (1) indicates that parity has been more or less achieved. The greater the deviation from 1 greater the disparity is.
  • N
    • März 2016
      Quelle: African Development Bank Group
      Hochgeladen von: Knoema
      Zugriff am: 24 Oktober, 2016
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      3The Africa Infrastructure Country Diagnostic (AICD) was an unprecedented knowledge program on Africa’s infrastructure that grew out of the pledge by the G8 Summit of 2005 at Gleneagles to substantially increase ODA assistance to Africa, particularly to the infrastructure sector, and the subsequent formation of the Infrastructure Consortium for Africa (ICA). The AICD study was founded on the recognition that sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) suffers from a very weak infrastructural base, and that this is a key factor in the SSA region failing to realize its full potential for economic growth, international trade, and poverty reduction. The study broke new ground, with primary data collection efforts covering network service infrastructures (ICT, power, water & sanitation, road transport, rail transport, sea transport, and air transport) from 2001 to 2006 in 24 selected African countries. Between them, these countries account for 85 percent of the sub-Saharan Africa population, GDP, and infrastructure inflows. The countries included in the initial study were: Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, Senegal, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia. The study also represents an unprecedented effort to collect detailed economic and technical data on African infrastructure in relation to the fiscal costs of each of the sectors, future sector investment needs, and sector performance indicators. As a result, it has been possible for the first time to portray the magnitude of the continent’s infrastructure challenges and to provide detailed and substantiated estimates on spending needs, funding gaps, and the potential efficiency dividends to be derived from policy reforms.
    • Oktober 2015
      Quelle: Water FootPrint Network
      Hochgeladen von: Knoema
      Zugriff am: 26 Oktober, 2015
      Datensatz auswählen
      Data cited at: The Water Footprint Network https://waterfootprint.org/en/ Topic: National water footprint statistics Publication: https://waterfootprint.org/en/resources/waterstat/national-water-footprint-statistics/ Water footprints of national consumption (1996-2005) Reference: Hoekstra, A.Y. & Mekonnen, M.M. (2012) 'The water footprint of humanity’, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 109(9): 3232–3237. Water footprints of national production (1996-2005) Reference: Hoekstra, A.Y. & Mekonnen, M.M. (2012) 'The water footprint of humanity’, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 109(9): 3232–3237. License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
  • S
    • August 2018
      Quelle: Social Progress Imperative
      Hochgeladen von: Knoema
      Zugriff am: 21 November, 2018
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      The Social Progress Index is a new way to define the success of our societies. It is a comprehensive measure of real quality of life, independent of economic indicators. The Social Progress Index is designed to complement, rather than replace, economic measures such as GDP. Each year, Social Progress Imperative conducts a comprehensive review of all indicators included in the Social Progress Index framework to check data updates (which frequently include retroactive revisions) and whether new indicators have been published that are well-suited to describing social progress concepts. Such a review necessitates a recalculation of previously published versions of the Social Progress Index, as any removal or additions of indicators to the framework or changes due to retroactive revisions in data from the original data sources prevent comparability between previously published versions of the Social Progress Index and the 2018 Social Progress Index. Therefore, using the 2018 Social Progress Index framework and methodology, we provide comparable historical data for four additional years of the Social Progress Index, from 2014 to 2017. To read more about our methodology, please see the 2018 Methodology here https://www.socialprogress.org/index/methodology
    • April 2019
      Quelle: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Hochgeladen von: Knoema
      Zugriff am: 12 April, 2019
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    • Juli 2018
      Quelle: Sustainable Development Solutions Network
      Hochgeladen von: Knoema
      Zugriff am: 10 August, 2018
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      The 2018 SDG Index and Dashboards report presents a revised and updated assessment of countries’ distance to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). It includes detailed SDG Dashboards to help identify implementation priorities for the SDGs. The report also provides a ranking of countries by the aggregate SDG Index of overall performance.
  • T
    • Februar 2015
      Quelle: University of Keele
      Hochgeladen von: Knoema
      Zugriff am: 24 April, 2015
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      This water poverty index is a first pass at trying to establish an international measure comparing performance in the water sector across countries in a holistic way that brings in the diverse aspects and issues that are relevant. It does seem to give some sensible results but it does not pretend to be definitive nor offer a totally accurate measure of the situation.
  • U
    • September 2018
      Quelle: United Nations Environment Programme
      Hochgeladen von: Knoema
      Zugriff am: 22 Oktober, 2018
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    • Juli 2017
      Quelle: United Nations Children's Fund
      Hochgeladen von: Knoema
      Zugriff am: 23 August, 2017
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      According to UNICEF report, in 2015, seven out of ten people used a safely managed drinking water service. Universal access to safe drinking water is a fundamental need and human right. Securing access for all would go a long way in reducing illness and death, especially among children. Since 2000, 1.4 billion people have gained access to basic drinking water services, such as piped water into the home or a protected dug well. In 2015, 844 million people still lack a basic water service and among them almost 159 million people still collected drinking water directly from rivers, lakes and other surface water sources. The data reveal pronounced disparities, with the poorest and those living in rural areas least likely to use a basic service. “Safely managed” water services represent an ambitious new rung on the ladder used to track progress on drinking water. In 2015, 5.2 billion people used safely managed services, i.e. accessible on premises, available when needed and free from contamination. A further 1.3 billion used a ‘basic’ water service, i.e. improved sources within 30 minutes per round trip to collect water. Over a quarter of a billion (258 million) used a ‘limited’ service where water collection from an improved source exceeded 30 minutes. In most countries the burden of water collection continues to fall mainly to women and girls.
  • W
    • September 2015
      Quelle: Water FootPrint Network
      Hochgeladen von: Knoema
      Zugriff am: 27 Oktober, 2015
      Datensatz auswählen
      Data cited at: The Water Footprint Network https://waterfootprint.org/en/ Topic: Product water footprint statistics Publication: https://waterfootprint.org/en/resources/waterstat/product-water-footprint-statistics/ Reference: Mekonnen, M.M. & Hoekstra, A.Y. (2012) A global assessment of the water footprint of farm animal products, Ecosystems, 15(3): 401–415. License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/  
    • September 2015
      Quelle: Water FootPrint Network
      Hochgeladen von: Knoema
      Zugriff am: 27 Oktober, 2015
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      Data cited at: The Water Footprint Network https://waterfootprint.org/en/ Topic: Product water footprint statistics Publication: https://waterfootprint.org/en/resources/waterstat/product-water-footprint-statistics/ Reference: Mekonnen, M.M. & Hoekstra, A.Y. (2011) National water footprint accounts: the green, blue and grey water footprint of production and consumption, Value of Water Research Report Series No.50, UNESCO-IHE, Delft, the Netherlands. License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/  
    • Juli 2017
      Quelle: World Health Organization
      Hochgeladen von: Knoema
      Zugriff am: 08 Februar, 2018
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    • Dezember 2011
      Quelle: World Resources Institute
      Hochgeladen von: Knoema
      Zugriff am: 15 Dezember, 2011
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      Water Resources and Freshwater Ecosystems